S.C.U.M (Supreme Cut Untouched Magnificence)

Artist: Da Flyy Hooligan

Label: 22 Entertainment

By Andrew Kay | 06 December 2017

London emcee Da Flyy Hooligan has been called, in some quarters, the new Slick Rick. Perhaps that’s overegging the rap pudding, but he’s definitely a talent to watch, as we take a track-by-track analysis of his new album, startlingly and uncompromisingly called S.C.U.M, which seems to be more a badge of honour than a label of disrespect.

Gourmet Body must be the nicest and nastiest ode to oral sex in a high-class setting ever put to song. Verbose silkiness over a lovely combo of female vocalist and smooth piano, with the beat changing two and half minutes into the song into what sounds like a disorted Da Flyy going from lover man to Alpha male. They we get a sample of two Cockney spivs  talking about nothing in particular.

Black Givenchy: Pronounced incorrectly by Hooligan, but the beat has some lush flutes and lounge piano with Hooligan illustrating yet another sexual conquest in an expensive, high-live setting.

Cuisine Shippers stops halfway through to use a sample the film Snatch (2000) and then we’re back to a hypnotic beat and Hooligan’s heavy accented rhyme flow. Again, the track changes up in terms of tone and then it’s back to the two broke Cockney spivs trying to distract a barman from paying for a couple of pints.

Gold Bars sees Hooligan back to the "obilex" of his dreams, of his potential for some crassly entertaining sex rhymes. The beat is fairly original, but the momentum is challenged with a more hardcore, upbeat baseline after only a minute. It’s an improvement, but why the short-attention span and changes in town and narrative so quickly? It’s original, but I’m not sure if it works. The track features, I assume, a Blaxplotation film sample which I didn’t recognise, but it sounded funky and laid-back enough.

Saville Row has a vocal sample from famed tailor Oswald Boteng over a dramatic Spanish female sample into more sex rhymes and an overly dramatic score with help from rapper Westside Gunn.

Alligator Skin is a descriptive boastful track about the nature of violence, stealing material items and cunnilingus that changes after about three minutes with a different beat and a thirty second seillique

Asanthinini has a delicious beat, over boastful rhymes, about sex and the good life and keeping the Beta Males scared and compliant. Hooligan manages to make something outta nothing. It’s a funny, creative cut. Calling himself the “Ray Winestone of Rap” gets him extra kudos.

Smockin’ Mirrors has a nice 80s pop foundation and flute flavour. The lyrics are in keeping with much of the rest of the album, but as Hooligan is an amiable, approachable sorta chap, (on the basis of the album,) you roll with and are entertained by it.

Lewis Hamilton has the nicest and the deepest music, in terms of sonics. It’s on some spacey type shizzle, blasting off into some paralle universe.  Lewis’ voice is sampled towards the end of the song. Maybe it’s a metaphor for riding high or riding into the sunset?

Sean Price: An ode to the famed rapper and producer who passed away last year. It’s a fitting ode and tribute to a talent lost far too early. Nice vocal samples morphing into the Impeach the President break for another thirty second book-ending freestyle.

Distress Signals features Hus Kingpin and has a decent beat with a cooing electronic bird-sounding whistle. Nice, sinister rhymes for the head-nodding faternitiy.

My Write Arm brings things back to a lounge lizard, jazzy type of affair. It’s all pianos and plink, plink with some reflective lyrics and a jar to put tips in for requests.

There seems to be a trend of rappers nowadays changing beat half way through a song; Kendrick Lamar is a major utiliser of this trend. Da Flyy Hooligan has enough skill in his locker to navigate each sonic wave with a power and a bragging swagger. It’s a solid album for O.G boom-bappers and newbies alike.

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